Čís. položky 743


Pier Paolo Calzolari *


(born in Bologna in 1943)
Untitled, 1970, signed and dated Calzolari 1970 on the reverse, lead and candle on board, 103 x 72 x 8 cm

Photo certificate signed by the artist.

The registration in the Fondazione Calzolari has been requested for this lot.

Provenance:
Giovanni e Gian Ruggero Manzoni
Fiorentini Collection, Rome
Poleschi Casa d’Aste, Milan, 15 May 2013, lot 234
European Private Collection

Pier Paolo Calzolari was born in Bologna in 1943. He spent his childhood and youth in the lagoon city of Venice and immersed himself in its intangible atmosphere, the mysterious light that Giorgione captured in his paintings. In 1965, in search of an ideal place to develop his artistic expression and plastic vocabulary, Calzolari began to travel the world: Bologna, Paris, New York, Berlin, Milan, Vienna, Crete, Morocco…
He adopted a variety of artistic techniques ranging from sculpture and painting to performance, installation and video, which makes it difficult to classify his work. Although he is usually assigned to the Arte Povera movement, Calzolari does not fit any existing frame. He wrote La Casa Ideale, which is considered a key work of the movement initiated by German Celant, but did not meet any representatives of Arte Povera (with the exception of Pascali, Pistoletto and Paolini) until Gian Enzo Sperone, a Turin gallery owner and supporter of Arte Povera, won him over after seeing his works at an exhibition in Bologna in 1970.
From 1972 onwards, all those artists followed different paths and developed diverging solutions. So too did Calzolari, whose work, far from being repetitive or conformist, does not fit any traditional category.
Like many Arte Povera artists, Calzolari uses ephemeral, fleeting, natural materials to create works the poetry of which stems not from their final form but from the idea they evoke, the sentiment from which they emerge, the sensation they trigger, the forgotten dream they return to reality.
The artist significantly used a quotation from the Australian science-fiction writer Arthur Bertram Chandler as a title for one of his work series:
When the dreamer dies, what of the dream?
The fact the Calzolari uses these materials to search for the absolute clearly demonstrates his concept of art as perpetual transformation and change. His work is dominated by a reality informed by random events. He stressed that “consistency is by no means a part of me.”
And it is true that his works, just like human existence, are characterised by constant movement and continuous change.
The poetry and formal elegance of his creations, the fundamental conceptual refinement and beauty of his solutions, which result from his appreciation of the intrinsic quality of the materials, make Calzolari a key figure of Italian and international art from the late 1960s. He is as close to Arte Povera and concept art as he is to American minimalism or the artistic designs of Joseph Beuys.

Photo certificate signed by the artist.

The registration in the Fondazione Calzolari has been required for this lot.

Provenance:
Giovanni e Gian Ruggero Manzoni
Fiorentini Collection, Rome
Poleschi Casa d’Aste, Milan, 15 May 2013, lot 234
European Private Collection

Pier Paolo Calzolari was born in Bologna in 1943. He spent his childhood and youth in the lagoon city of Venice and immersed himself in its intangible atmosphere, the mysterious light that Giorgione captured in his paintings. In 1965, in search of an ideal place to develop his artistic expression and plastic vocabulary, Calzolari began to travel the world: Bologna, Paris, New York, Berlin, Milan, Vienna, Crete, Morocco…
He adopted a variety of artistic techniques ranging from sculpture and painting to performance, installation and video, which makes it difficult to classify his work. Although he is usually assigned to the Arte Povera movement, Calzolari does not fit any existing frame. He wrote La Casa Ideale, which is considered a key work of the movement initiated by German Celant, but did not meet any representatives of Arte Povera (with the exception of Pascali, Pistoletto and Paolini) until Gian Enzo Sperone, a Turin gallery owner and supporter of Arte Povera, won him over after seeing his works at an exhibition in Bologna in 1970.
From 1972 onwards, all those artists followed different paths and developed diverging solutions. So too did Calzolari, whose work, far from being repetitive or conformist, does not fit any traditional category.
Like many Arte Povera artists, Calzolari uses ephemeral, fleeting, natural materials to create works the poetry of which stems not from their final form but from the idea they evoke, the sentiment from which they emerge, the sensation they trigger, the forgotten dream they return to reality.
The artist significantly used a quotation from the Australian science-fiction writer Arthur Bertram Chandler as a title for one of his work series:
When the dreamer dies, what of the dream?
The fact the Calzolari uses these materials to search for the absolute clearly demonstrates his concept of art as perpetual transformation and change. His work is dominated by a reality informed by random events. He stressed that “consistency is by no means a part of me.”
And it is true that his works, just like human existence, are characterised by constant movement and continuous change.
The poetry and formal elegance of his creations, the fundamental conceptual refinement and beauty of his solutions, which result from his appreciation of the intrinsic quality of the materials, make Calzolari a key figure of Italian and international art from the late 1960s. He is as close to Arte Povera and concept art as he is to American minimalism or the artistic designs of Joseph Beuys.

22.11.2016 - 18:00

Dosažená cena: **
EUR 149.400,-
Odhadní cena:
EUR 120.000,- do EUR 160.000,-

Pier Paolo Calzolari *


(born in Bologna in 1943)
Untitled, 1970, signed and dated Calzolari 1970 on the reverse, lead and candle on board, 103 x 72 x 8 cm

Photo certificate signed by the artist.

The registration in the Fondazione Calzolari has been requested for this lot.

Provenance:
Giovanni e Gian Ruggero Manzoni
Fiorentini Collection, Rome
Poleschi Casa d’Aste, Milan, 15 May 2013, lot 234
European Private Collection

Pier Paolo Calzolari was born in Bologna in 1943. He spent his childhood and youth in the lagoon city of Venice and immersed himself in its intangible atmosphere, the mysterious light that Giorgione captured in his paintings. In 1965, in search of an ideal place to develop his artistic expression and plastic vocabulary, Calzolari began to travel the world: Bologna, Paris, New York, Berlin, Milan, Vienna, Crete, Morocco…
He adopted a variety of artistic techniques ranging from sculpture and painting to performance, installation and video, which makes it difficult to classify his work. Although he is usually assigned to the Arte Povera movement, Calzolari does not fit any existing frame. He wrote La Casa Ideale, which is considered a key work of the movement initiated by German Celant, but did not meet any representatives of Arte Povera (with the exception of Pascali, Pistoletto and Paolini) until Gian Enzo Sperone, a Turin gallery owner and supporter of Arte Povera, won him over after seeing his works at an exhibition in Bologna in 1970.
From 1972 onwards, all those artists followed different paths and developed diverging solutions. So too did Calzolari, whose work, far from being repetitive or conformist, does not fit any traditional category.
Like many Arte Povera artists, Calzolari uses ephemeral, fleeting, natural materials to create works the poetry of which stems not from their final form but from the idea they evoke, the sentiment from which they emerge, the sensation they trigger, the forgotten dream they return to reality.
The artist significantly used a quotation from the Australian science-fiction writer Arthur Bertram Chandler as a title for one of his work series:
When the dreamer dies, what of the dream?
The fact the Calzolari uses these materials to search for the absolute clearly demonstrates his concept of art as perpetual transformation and change. His work is dominated by a reality informed by random events. He stressed that “consistency is by no means a part of me.”
And it is true that his works, just like human existence, are characterised by constant movement and continuous change.
The poetry and formal elegance of his creations, the fundamental conceptual refinement and beauty of his solutions, which result from his appreciation of the intrinsic quality of the materials, make Calzolari a key figure of Italian and international art from the late 1960s. He is as close to Arte Povera and concept art as he is to American minimalism or the artistic designs of Joseph Beuys.

Photo certificate signed by the artist.

The registration in the Fondazione Calzolari has been required for this lot.

Provenance:
Giovanni e Gian Ruggero Manzoni
Fiorentini Collection, Rome
Poleschi Casa d’Aste, Milan, 15 May 2013, lot 234
European Private Collection

Pier Paolo Calzolari was born in Bologna in 1943. He spent his childhood and youth in the lagoon city of Venice and immersed himself in its intangible atmosphere, the mysterious light that Giorgione captured in his paintings. In 1965, in search of an ideal place to develop his artistic expression and plastic vocabulary, Calzolari began to travel the world: Bologna, Paris, New York, Berlin, Milan, Vienna, Crete, Morocco…
He adopted a variety of artistic techniques ranging from sculpture and painting to performance, installation and video, which makes it difficult to classify his work. Although he is usually assigned to the Arte Povera movement, Calzolari does not fit any existing frame. He wrote La Casa Ideale, which is considered a key work of the movement initiated by German Celant, but did not meet any representatives of Arte Povera (with the exception of Pascali, Pistoletto and Paolini) until Gian Enzo Sperone, a Turin gallery owner and supporter of Arte Povera, won him over after seeing his works at an exhibition in Bologna in 1970.
From 1972 onwards, all those artists followed different paths and developed diverging solutions. So too did Calzolari, whose work, far from being repetitive or conformist, does not fit any traditional category.
Like many Arte Povera artists, Calzolari uses ephemeral, fleeting, natural materials to create works the poetry of which stems not from their final form but from the idea they evoke, the sentiment from which they emerge, the sensation they trigger, the forgotten dream they return to reality.
The artist significantly used a quotation from the Australian science-fiction writer Arthur Bertram Chandler as a title for one of his work series:
When the dreamer dies, what of the dream?
The fact the Calzolari uses these materials to search for the absolute clearly demonstrates his concept of art as perpetual transformation and change. His work is dominated by a reality informed by random events. He stressed that “consistency is by no means a part of me.”
And it is true that his works, just like human existence, are characterised by constant movement and continuous change.
The poetry and formal elegance of his creations, the fundamental conceptual refinement and beauty of his solutions, which result from his appreciation of the intrinsic quality of the materials, make Calzolari a key figure of Italian and international art from the late 1960s. He is as close to Arte Povera and concept art as he is to American minimalism or the artistic designs of Joseph Beuys.


Horká linka kupujících Po-Pá: 9.00 - 18.00
kundendienst@dorotheum.at

+43 1 515 60 200
Aukce: Současné umění I
Datum: 22.11.2016 - 18:00
Místo konání aukce: Vídeň | Palais Dorotheum
Prohlídka: 12.11. - 22.11.2016


** Kupní cena vč. poplatku kupujícího a DPH

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