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Čís. položky 1172


Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller


Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller - Gemälde des 19. Jahrhunderts

(Vienna 1793–1865)
Black-Haired Woman in a White Dress and Wine Red Shawl, on the reverse signed and dated Waldmüller pinx.1818, oil on canvas, 63 x 50 cm, framed, restored, (Rei)

Catalogued and illustrated in:
Bruno Grimschitz, Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller, published by Galerie Welz, Salzburg 1957, p.278, no.37; Rupert Feuchtmüller, Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller 1793–1865, Leben, Schriften, Werke, published by Christian Brandstätter, Vienna 1996, p. 421, no.35

Provenance:
Austrian private property.

Viennese portrait painting experienced a new golden age in the period following 1815. Broad swathes of society discovered an urge to bequeath future generations with an image of their likeness, securing a livelihood for legions of artists. Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller, whose oeuvre encompasses over 500 artworks, was among the most productive portrait painters of his time. The astonishing vivacity of his images today epitomises the epoch between the Congress of Vienna and the 1848 Revolution (cf. Felbinger, in: Husslein-Arco, Grabner (ed.), Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller, Vienna 2009, exhibition catalogue, p. 68).
Waldmüller was already working as a portrait painter during his time as a student at the Vienna Academy, and it was here, during his earliest independent forays into the life of a professional portrait painter, that he earned his first keep, painting miniature portraits from 1811 onward. He learned to be forgiving in his depictions of reality, to executive every single part of the painting with precision, to transmit a sharpness and poignancy, and to exercise patience (cf. Bruno Grimschitz, Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller, Salzburg 1957, p.30).
He completed a number of commissioned portraits in 1818, the year in which this painting was executed. In it he achieves a direct, natural and forceful expressiveness. The flesh tones are warm, and he offers a virtuoso rendition of the materials (cf. Rupert Feuchtmüller, Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller 1793-1865, Leben, Schriften, Werke, Vienna 1996, p 28, 29). Waldmüller excels in his ability to blend masterfully realistic detail, striking vivacity and the perfect illusion of materiality (cf. Felbinger, in: Husslein-Arco, Grabner (ed.), Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller, Vienna 2009, exhibition catalogue, p. 69).
Grimschitz writes of the ‘motif of serene sitting’ which is manifest with extraordinary versatility in Waldmüller’s paintings, above all in his portrayal of the subject’s mental state. However reticent he paints the various demeanours, eschewing any excess of emotion as much as physical presence, the subjects of his paintings nevertheless appear consumed with a spirited and buoyant excitement. The models appear before the artist with a natural lack of inhibition, while the painter imbues his subjects with all their idiosyncrasies and replete with self-sufficiency, effectively disowning the inherently subjective nature of his personal perspective. Waldmüller was unusually quick with his brush, requiring just three sessions to produce a portrait (cf. Bruno Grimschitz, Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller, Salzburg 1957, p.39, 42). Nevertheless, his commitment to capturing the fullness of his subject’s nature compelled the artist to scrutinise his models constantly while at work (Schröder, Waldmüller, Munich 1990, p. 10).

Expert: Mag. Dimitra Reimüller Mag. Dimitra Reimüller
+43-1-515 60-355

19c.paintings@dorotheum.at

22.10.2015 - 18:00

Dosažená cena: **
EUR 12.500,-
Odhadní cena:
EUR 12.000,- do EUR 16.000,-

Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller


(Vienna 1793–1865)
Black-Haired Woman in a White Dress and Wine Red Shawl, on the reverse signed and dated Waldmüller pinx.1818, oil on canvas, 63 x 50 cm, framed, restored, (Rei)

Catalogued and illustrated in:
Bruno Grimschitz, Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller, published by Galerie Welz, Salzburg 1957, p.278, no.37; Rupert Feuchtmüller, Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller 1793–1865, Leben, Schriften, Werke, published by Christian Brandstätter, Vienna 1996, p. 421, no.35

Provenance:
Austrian private property.

Viennese portrait painting experienced a new golden age in the period following 1815. Broad swathes of society discovered an urge to bequeath future generations with an image of their likeness, securing a livelihood for legions of artists. Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller, whose oeuvre encompasses over 500 artworks, was among the most productive portrait painters of his time. The astonishing vivacity of his images today epitomises the epoch between the Congress of Vienna and the 1848 Revolution (cf. Felbinger, in: Husslein-Arco, Grabner (ed.), Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller, Vienna 2009, exhibition catalogue, p. 68).
Waldmüller was already working as a portrait painter during his time as a student at the Vienna Academy, and it was here, during his earliest independent forays into the life of a professional portrait painter, that he earned his first keep, painting miniature portraits from 1811 onward. He learned to be forgiving in his depictions of reality, to executive every single part of the painting with precision, to transmit a sharpness and poignancy, and to exercise patience (cf. Bruno Grimschitz, Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller, Salzburg 1957, p.30).
He completed a number of commissioned portraits in 1818, the year in which this painting was executed. In it he achieves a direct, natural and forceful expressiveness. The flesh tones are warm, and he offers a virtuoso rendition of the materials (cf. Rupert Feuchtmüller, Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller 1793-1865, Leben, Schriften, Werke, Vienna 1996, p 28, 29). Waldmüller excels in his ability to blend masterfully realistic detail, striking vivacity and the perfect illusion of materiality (cf. Felbinger, in: Husslein-Arco, Grabner (ed.), Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller, Vienna 2009, exhibition catalogue, p. 69).
Grimschitz writes of the ‘motif of serene sitting’ which is manifest with extraordinary versatility in Waldmüller’s paintings, above all in his portrayal of the subject’s mental state. However reticent he paints the various demeanours, eschewing any excess of emotion as much as physical presence, the subjects of his paintings nevertheless appear consumed with a spirited and buoyant excitement. The models appear before the artist with a natural lack of inhibition, while the painter imbues his subjects with all their idiosyncrasies and replete with self-sufficiency, effectively disowning the inherently subjective nature of his personal perspective. Waldmüller was unusually quick with his brush, requiring just three sessions to produce a portrait (cf. Bruno Grimschitz, Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller, Salzburg 1957, p.39, 42). Nevertheless, his commitment to capturing the fullness of his subject’s nature compelled the artist to scrutinise his models constantly while at work (Schröder, Waldmüller, Munich 1990, p. 10).

Expert: Mag. Dimitra Reimüller Mag. Dimitra Reimüller
+43-1-515 60-355

19c.paintings@dorotheum.at


Horká linka kupujících Po-Pá: 9.00 - 18.00
kundendienst@dorotheum.at

+43 1 515 60 200
Aukce: Gemälde des 19. Jahrhunderts
Datum: 22.10.2015 - 18:00
Místo konání aukce: Wien | Palais Dorotheum
Prohlídka: 10.10. - 22.10.2015


** Kupní cena vč. poplatku kupujícího a DPH

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