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Čís. položky 266


Circle of Pasquale Rossi, called Pasqualino de Rossi


(Vicenza 1641–1725 Rome)
Episodes including Cabalao,
oil on canvas, 113 x 170 cm, framed

Inscribed on a cartouche at the lower left corner of the painting are the following verses:

Quando che Cabalao vendeva menole,
e adesso va criando aghi da pomolo,
e aghi da Lanzan per ste petegole.
Quando che Cabalao vendeva zoccoli,
e adesso el va criando riose e boccoli.

These verses are taken from the Venetian poem: Capitolo in sdruzzolo. In laude del Famosissimo Cabalao by Francesco Cieco Veronese. This text was popular in the late sixteenth century and early seventeenth century, and it was repeatedly published in Venice and Bologna.

The present painting represents a number of episodes derived from the Capitolo alongside others which never published but which were rooted in the oral tradition. The second verse inscribed on the cartouche at the lower left is a notable example of the oral form.

Quando che Cabalao vendeva zoccoli,
e adesso el va criando riose e boccoli.

This text does not appear in any of the known printed editions of this poem; however, its subject is depicted immediately beyond the cartouche in the present painting: Cabalao is shown selling clogs, roses and rose buds to a pair of young maids. Cabalao appears again on the right side of the canvas, where he is depicted on a larger scale surrounded by courtesans. This unusual narrative composition, is populated by strange characters taken from everyday life of seventeenth century Venice.

Stylistically this painting is to close to the work Pasquale de’ Rossi, called Pasqualino Rossi, and his circle (see A. M. Massari Ambrosini, A. Mazza, Pasqualino Rossi: 1641-1722. Grazie e affetti di un artista del Seicento, exhibition catalogue, Cinisello Balsamo 2009). Pasqualino Rossi is known for his genre paintings and integrated his formative Venetian training, influenced by Pietro della Vecchia and Matteo Ghidoni, called Matteo de’ Pitocchi, with his studies of Emilian and Roman painting. In Rome he was admitted to the Virtuosi al Pantheon and the Accademia di San Luca and he received accolades for his depictions of everyday life, including ladies engaged in sewing, concert scenes or single figure compositions depicting mendicants and pipe smokers. His genre paintings were popular with collectors including Gaspar Méndez de Haro y Guzmán, 7th Marquis Carpio and Spanish ambassador to the Holy See and later Viceroy of Naples who owned about forty of his paintings.

Expert: Mark MacDonnell Mark MacDonnell
+43 1 515 60 403

mark.macdonnell@dorotheum.at

10.11.2020 - 16:00

Odhadní cena:
EUR 40.000,- do EUR 60.000,-

Circle of Pasquale Rossi, called Pasqualino de Rossi


(Vicenza 1641–1725 Rome)
Episodes including Cabalao,
oil on canvas, 113 x 170 cm, framed

Inscribed on a cartouche at the lower left corner of the painting are the following verses:

Quando che Cabalao vendeva menole,
e adesso va criando aghi da pomolo,
e aghi da Lanzan per ste petegole.
Quando che Cabalao vendeva zoccoli,
e adesso el va criando riose e boccoli.

These verses are taken from the Venetian poem: Capitolo in sdruzzolo. In laude del Famosissimo Cabalao by Francesco Cieco Veronese. This text was popular in the late sixteenth century and early seventeenth century, and it was repeatedly published in Venice and Bologna.

The present painting represents a number of episodes derived from the Capitolo alongside others which never published but which were rooted in the oral tradition. The second verse inscribed on the cartouche at the lower left is a notable example of the oral form.

Quando che Cabalao vendeva zoccoli,
e adesso el va criando riose e boccoli.

This text does not appear in any of the known printed editions of this poem; however, its subject is depicted immediately beyond the cartouche in the present painting: Cabalao is shown selling clogs, roses and rose buds to a pair of young maids. Cabalao appears again on the right side of the canvas, where he is depicted on a larger scale surrounded by courtesans. This unusual narrative composition, is populated by strange characters taken from everyday life of seventeenth century Venice.

Stylistically this painting is to close to the work Pasquale de’ Rossi, called Pasqualino Rossi, and his circle (see A. M. Massari Ambrosini, A. Mazza, Pasqualino Rossi: 1641-1722. Grazie e affetti di un artista del Seicento, exhibition catalogue, Cinisello Balsamo 2009). Pasqualino Rossi is known for his genre paintings and integrated his formative Venetian training, influenced by Pietro della Vecchia and Matteo Ghidoni, called Matteo de’ Pitocchi, with his studies of Emilian and Roman painting. In Rome he was admitted to the Virtuosi al Pantheon and the Accademia di San Luca and he received accolades for his depictions of everyday life, including ladies engaged in sewing, concert scenes or single figure compositions depicting mendicants and pipe smokers. His genre paintings were popular with collectors including Gaspar Méndez de Haro y Guzmán, 7th Marquis Carpio and Spanish ambassador to the Holy See and later Viceroy of Naples who owned about forty of his paintings.

Expert: Mark MacDonnell Mark MacDonnell
+43 1 515 60 403

mark.macdonnell@dorotheum.at


Horká linka kupujících Po-Pá: 9.00 - 18.00
old.masters@dorotheum.at

+43 1 515 60 403
Aukce: Obrazy starých mistrů
Datum: 10.11.2020 - 16:00
Místo konání aukce: Vídeň | Palais Dorotheum
Prohlídka: 04.11. - 10.11.2020