Čís. položky 142


Bernardo Canal


(Venice 1664–1744)
The Pantheon, Rome,
oil on canvas, 72.5 x 96.5 cm, framed

Provenance:
Private European collection

We are grateful to Dario Succi for confirming the attribution of the present painting on the basis of a photograph.

Bernardo Canal’s profession is identified as ‘pittore’ in the baptismal record of his son Antonio (17 October 1797), the celebrated Canaletto. In 1717 and between 1737–1743 his name appears in the register of the 'Fraglia dei pittori Veneziani'. From 1716 to 1718 Bernardo collaborated with his brother Cristoforo and his son Antonio on the execution of stage set designs for the Venetian theatres of Sant’ Angelo (1716–1717) and San Cassiano (1718–1719). In 1719–1720 he moved to Rome with his son to work on the stage sets of the operas 'Tito Sempronio Gracco' and 'Tullio' Aricino by Alessandro Scarlatti.

Over the course of the nineteenth century Bernardo Canal fell into obscurity, until Giuseppe Fiocco, on the occasion of the exhibition 'Pittura Veneta' (Riccoboni, Fiocco 1947, p. 12, nos. 71–72) brought to light two Venetian view paintings both inscribed on the back of their original canvases ‘Bernardo Canal Fecit 1735’. Fiocco observed that the two paintings, which are characterised by a lively sense of perspective ‘sembrerebbero di un Richter meno azzurrino’ [‘would seem to be by a less light-blue Richter’]. The two paintings belonged to a group of five canvases formerly conserved in the Palazzo Salom, Venice, later moved to Segromigno in Monte near Lucca – the other three were published by Rodolfo Pallucchini (see Appunti per il vedutismo veneziano del Settecento, in: Muzeum i tworka, 1969, pp. 145–146).

Subsequently Pallucchini (1994–1996, II, p. 298) summarised the principal characteristics of Bernardo Canal’s style, observing that the skies in his view paintings are distinguished by ‘nuvole bianche zigzaganti in diagonale, luminose e lucide a un tempo, per via di un segno pittorico assai netto. Si direbbe che Bernardo non riesca a staccarsi dal gusto di Carlevarijs […] che scalava i cieli con simili nubi […] tentando però di aggiornarle secondo i metodi liberamente pittorici del figlio’ [‘white diagonally zigzagging clouds, which are shiny and bright. One might say that Bernardo could not separate his style from that of Carlevarijs (…) who scaled the skies with similar clouds, with the objective of increasing perspectival depth (…) while attempting to update them according to the freely pictorial manner of his son’].

This composition represents the imposing structure of the Pantheon, one of Rome’s most celebrated monuments both on account of its grandeur and method of construction, as well as for its unique form, unifying the dome and circular cella of the termae type, with a traditional pronaos and tympanum. At the centre of the square stands the quatrefoil fountain raised on steps and adorned with dolphins, designed by Giacomo della Porta and sculpted by Leonardo Sormani in 1575.

Another version of the present painting, datable to the 1720s, was sold in these rooms, 8 June 2021, lot 118.

Expert: Mark MacDonnell Mark MacDonnell
+43 1 515 60 403

oldmasters@dorotheum.com

24.04.2024 - 18:00

Dosažená cena: **
EUR 26.000,-
Odhadní cena:
EUR 20.000,- do EUR 30.000,-

Bernardo Canal


(Venice 1664–1744)
The Pantheon, Rome,
oil on canvas, 72.5 x 96.5 cm, framed

Provenance:
Private European collection

We are grateful to Dario Succi for confirming the attribution of the present painting on the basis of a photograph.

Bernardo Canal’s profession is identified as ‘pittore’ in the baptismal record of his son Antonio (17 October 1797), the celebrated Canaletto. In 1717 and between 1737–1743 his name appears in the register of the 'Fraglia dei pittori Veneziani'. From 1716 to 1718 Bernardo collaborated with his brother Cristoforo and his son Antonio on the execution of stage set designs for the Venetian theatres of Sant’ Angelo (1716–1717) and San Cassiano (1718–1719). In 1719–1720 he moved to Rome with his son to work on the stage sets of the operas 'Tito Sempronio Gracco' and 'Tullio' Aricino by Alessandro Scarlatti.

Over the course of the nineteenth century Bernardo Canal fell into obscurity, until Giuseppe Fiocco, on the occasion of the exhibition 'Pittura Veneta' (Riccoboni, Fiocco 1947, p. 12, nos. 71–72) brought to light two Venetian view paintings both inscribed on the back of their original canvases ‘Bernardo Canal Fecit 1735’. Fiocco observed that the two paintings, which are characterised by a lively sense of perspective ‘sembrerebbero di un Richter meno azzurrino’ [‘would seem to be by a less light-blue Richter’]. The two paintings belonged to a group of five canvases formerly conserved in the Palazzo Salom, Venice, later moved to Segromigno in Monte near Lucca – the other three were published by Rodolfo Pallucchini (see Appunti per il vedutismo veneziano del Settecento, in: Muzeum i tworka, 1969, pp. 145–146).

Subsequently Pallucchini (1994–1996, II, p. 298) summarised the principal characteristics of Bernardo Canal’s style, observing that the skies in his view paintings are distinguished by ‘nuvole bianche zigzaganti in diagonale, luminose e lucide a un tempo, per via di un segno pittorico assai netto. Si direbbe che Bernardo non riesca a staccarsi dal gusto di Carlevarijs […] che scalava i cieli con simili nubi […] tentando però di aggiornarle secondo i metodi liberamente pittorici del figlio’ [‘white diagonally zigzagging clouds, which are shiny and bright. One might say that Bernardo could not separate his style from that of Carlevarijs (…) who scaled the skies with similar clouds, with the objective of increasing perspectival depth (…) while attempting to update them according to the freely pictorial manner of his son’].

This composition represents the imposing structure of the Pantheon, one of Rome’s most celebrated monuments both on account of its grandeur and method of construction, as well as for its unique form, unifying the dome and circular cella of the termae type, with a traditional pronaos and tympanum. At the centre of the square stands the quatrefoil fountain raised on steps and adorned with dolphins, designed by Giacomo della Porta and sculpted by Leonardo Sormani in 1575.

Another version of the present painting, datable to the 1720s, was sold in these rooms, 8 June 2021, lot 118.

Expert: Mark MacDonnell Mark MacDonnell
+43 1 515 60 403

oldmasters@dorotheum.com


Horká linka kupujících Po-Pá: 10.00 - 17.00
old.masters@dorotheum.at

+43 1 515 60 403
Aukce: Obrazy starých mistrů
Typ aukce: Sálová aukce s Live bidding
Datum: 24.04.2024 - 18:00
Místo konání aukce: Wien | Palais Dorotheum
Prohlídka: 13.04. - 24.04.2024


** Kupní cena vč. poplatku kupujícího a DPH

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