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Lot No. 30


Jacob Jordaens and Workshop


Jacob Jordaens and Workshop - Old Master Paintings I

(Antwerp 1593–1678)
The Adoration of the Magi,
oil on canvas, 122.2 x 92.1 cm, framed

Provenance:
sale, Brussels, Palais des Beaux-Arts, 30 November 1936, lot 179 (as Jacob Jordaens);
sale, Sotheby’s, London, 4 December 2014, lot 187;
where acquired by the present owner

The present canvas depicting the Adoration of the Magi is a typical work within the oeuvre of Jacob Jordaens. The painterly brio of Jordaens is most readily apparent in the dynamic figure of Caspar kneeling in the foreground. The contraposto of Caspar’s legs and body can be made-out beneath richly textured folds of drapery while the highlights upon his balding head and swinging censer are rendered with the master’s characteristic vivacity. Jordaens re-worked the same motif of a kneeling Caspar for the altar of a since-ruined church in Diksmuide, now known from its modello conserved in the Staatliche Gemäldegalerie, Kassel. The background and some of the figures may be the work of an assistant.

In spite of his Protestant faith, (his body was taken to the Dutch Republic for burial) Jordaens painted works for the art market of Antwerp, a bastion of the Catholic Counter-Reformation. The present Adoration of the Magi appears to be influenced by a 1624 work with the same subject by Peter Paul Rubens, whom Jordaens knew from the two mens’ training under Adam van Noort. The camels rearing their heads in the background, the poses of Mary and Joseph and the architectural setting of the stable before an antique stone column appear borrowed from Rubens’s composition painted for Saint Michael’s Abbey in Antwerp (now in the city’s Royal Museum of Fine Arts, inv. no. 298.)

In the present picture, one of Jordaens’s several compositional innovations is to move the muscled nude, possibly a shepherd or an attendant of the magi, from the background to the foreground, placing him crouching beside Caspar, emphasising the contrast between the rustic and the courtly. This male type also appears in the foreground on the right of Jordaens’s Adoration of the Shepherds (North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, inv. no. G.55.7.1) which is dated 1657. This may point to the present work having been painted in that same period when, following the death of Rubens and Anthony van Dyck, Jordaens had become the foremost artist of the Flemish Baroque.

22.10.2019 - 17:00

Realized price: **
EUR 87,800.-
Estimate:
EUR 70,000.- to EUR 100,000.-

Jacob Jordaens and Workshop


(Antwerp 1593–1678)
The Adoration of the Magi,
oil on canvas, 122.2 x 92.1 cm, framed

Provenance:
sale, Brussels, Palais des Beaux-Arts, 30 November 1936, lot 179 (as Jacob Jordaens);
sale, Sotheby’s, London, 4 December 2014, lot 187;
where acquired by the present owner

The present canvas depicting the Adoration of the Magi is a typical work within the oeuvre of Jacob Jordaens. The painterly brio of Jordaens is most readily apparent in the dynamic figure of Caspar kneeling in the foreground. The contraposto of Caspar’s legs and body can be made-out beneath richly textured folds of drapery while the highlights upon his balding head and swinging censer are rendered with the master’s characteristic vivacity. Jordaens re-worked the same motif of a kneeling Caspar for the altar of a since-ruined church in Diksmuide, now known from its modello conserved in the Staatliche Gemäldegalerie, Kassel. The background and some of the figures may be the work of an assistant.

In spite of his Protestant faith, (his body was taken to the Dutch Republic for burial) Jordaens painted works for the art market of Antwerp, a bastion of the Catholic Counter-Reformation. The present Adoration of the Magi appears to be influenced by a 1624 work with the same subject by Peter Paul Rubens, whom Jordaens knew from the two mens’ training under Adam van Noort. The camels rearing their heads in the background, the poses of Mary and Joseph and the architectural setting of the stable before an antique stone column appear borrowed from Rubens’s composition painted for Saint Michael’s Abbey in Antwerp (now in the city’s Royal Museum of Fine Arts, inv. no. 298.)

In the present picture, one of Jordaens’s several compositional innovations is to move the muscled nude, possibly a shepherd or an attendant of the magi, from the background to the foreground, placing him crouching beside Caspar, emphasising the contrast between the rustic and the courtly. This male type also appears in the foreground on the right of Jordaens’s Adoration of the Shepherds (North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, inv. no. G.55.7.1) which is dated 1657. This may point to the present work having been painted in that same period when, following the death of Rubens and Anthony van Dyck, Jordaens had become the foremost artist of the Flemish Baroque.


Buyers hotline Mon.-Fri.: 9.00am - 6.00pm
old.masters@dorotheum.at

+43 1 515 60 403
Auction: Old Master Paintings I
Date: 22.10.2019 - 17:00
Location: Vienna | Palais Dorotheum
Exhibition: 12.10. - 22.10.2019


** Purchase price incl. charges and taxes

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